NRMs New projects
Religion in the 21st Century
George Chryssides 2014
Page created 15 September 2014
Last updated 13 October 2016
New publications
These new publications appeared in 2014
The Bloomsbury Companion to New Religious Movements (Bloomsbury 2014), co-edited with
Benjamin E. Zeller is a guide to state-of-the-art scholarship in the field of NRM (New Religious Movements) Studies.

For further information, click here.
To order, click here
The Study of Religion, co-authored with Ron Geaves, is a second, updated edition of our 2007 book of the same title. There are two new chapters - 'Insiders and outsiders' and 'Colonialism and post-colonialism', and a substantially updated and revised chapter on 'The internet as a resource'.

For further information, and access to Ron Geaves' chapter on 'Levels of religion' (from the 1st edition), click here.
Why Can't They Get Along? is a dialogue between a Christian (George D. Chryssides), a Jew (Dan Cohn-Sherbok) and a Muslim (Dawoud Elalami). It is aimed at the general reader, and we discuss a number of controversial issues on our religions' teachings, practices, lifestyle and societal issues in a forthright but friendly way.

For further details, click here.
For more information on forthcoming projects, please click here.
Jehovah's Witnesses:
Continuity and Change

is a ground-breaking study of the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society, exploring its origins in 19th century Adventism, and tracing its development from its inception to the present day.

The book is neither a critique of the organisation nor a defence of its beliefs and practices. The book seeks to explore the Witnesses' lifestyle, their understanding of the Bible and biblical prophecy, and their ways of worshipping Jehovah.
Terror and Religion:
An Interfaith Dialogue
Co-authored with Dan Cohn-Sherbok and Dawoud El-Alami, Terror and Religion is a discussion between representives of the three Abrahamic faiths
- Judaism, Christianity, Islam - on the themes of terror and violence. The book originated from the attack on the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris on 7 January 2015, and explores various issues relating to violence and its apparent links with religion. The discussion is friendly, but frank, presenting the views of these three faiths on war, violence, and terror, and - above all - the possibility of peace.